Questions about blogging: Are you as curious as I am?

A lot has happened in my life recently that I typically don’t divulge on the blog. I could write about it, and in some instances, I may at some point. But writing is a strange creature, to me. My writing mindset has to be *on*. Plus it feels like my words need to rattle around in my brain a little before I can type them out and hurl them into the social internet.

If too much goes on and I feel stuck, but still have a need to reach out to my blogging community, I do so by story-telling. (Or ranting, at times…😳).

Sometimes, when I feel particularly overwhelmed or weighed down, I write about light, simple, or fun topics. It seems to be a method for engaging a different channel in my brain, to allow my creativity about something less serious or tragic to populate my grey matter. You know what I mean, right?

Just look at my most recent posts. I talked about bone broth and frisky herbs. Or, I wrote about hiding candy from the kids, or about grammar and semi-colons…

I write like this during a still ongoing pandemic, major political upheaval in many countries, and multiple tragedies both at the home front and in the world.

Why?

Because sometimes, I just can’t process it all. Much less write deep and thought provoking blog posts about all of these issues. (Doesn’t mean I don’t think about them. Also doesn’t mean I’m sitting idle and doing nothing about them; like I said, sometimes I just don’t divulge it all on this blog.)

Having said that, there have been, over the years, several deep and thought provoking posts. One most recently, several in the past that touch on midlife drama, reflection on various life stages, and related subjects. I could list them here, but then that would imply I’m justifying my blog to you, and I don’t feel like doing that.

Mostly, I write for me. But when I get interactions from you, it does something to my spirit. It elevates it. It helps me to distract from the heavy, frantic weariness I often feel these days (and weeks and months). I enjoy the blogging community, and I thank you for being a part of it.

Now I want to know what you think about all this. You feel up to reading and pondering my questions, have a go at it. If you like to respond, even better. This is my topic for the day. Happy Sunday!😊

All about blogging

1) Does belonging to a blogging community imply a responsibility toward the bloggers?

2) Does it become a want or a need to read, like and/or comment regularly?

3) If you read, like and especially comment at least semi-regularly on a select few blogs and thereby get to *know* that blogger a little, does this relationship qualify as friendship?

4) Is a virtual relationship through a blog real?

5) Do you feel reading there every time they post is the responsible thing to do or do you drop off on occasion?

6) If you drop off, what are the reasons you are taking a break?

7) What if you extend the relationship with a blogger beyond the blog and start emailing with them? Does this make the relationship more intimate, more real?

8) With those more intimately connected bloggers whom you have an exterior relationship with (say through email) do you take the opportunity to check in with them when you read between the lines something they posted in their blog?

9) When you formulate an opinion on a blogger based solely on what you read on their blog, do you make assumptions about them and/or their personality, character, lifestyle?

I will answer my own questions after I give them some thought. For now, I will only say this:

Blogging is not dead (to me). I enjoy both writing and reading, and especially discovering new blogs.

My stats have increased quite significantly over the past year, mostly organically (i.e. I don’t advertise much, mostly I just comment on newly discovered blog posts if they intrigue me enough.)

If I do comment on a newly discovered blog post, I may dabble in that blog a little, starting with the About page. That’s why I wrote so much about that topic recently; many people either have no About page, or if they do, it’s out of date and not relevant to what I just finished reading on their blog.

I don’t typically follow everyone, and I can’t read everyone all the time either. You must be in the same boat; most people are. There is only so much time…

However, I do try to make an effort to engage with those whom I have developed a relationship with, whether through the blog alone or beyond.

This is called nurturing, I think. The blog, the author behind the blog, the friendship.

Anyway, it’s your turn. Looking forward to reading your thoughts.

87 thoughts on “Questions about blogging: Are you as curious as I am?

  1. I am able visualize my situation when reading your post. Like you, even I just dont get the words on a daily basis. I’ve been into blogging for a few years but have put limited posts. I see blogging as a way of getting thoughts out of my mind and a channel to express myself better. Though I have not reached a vast blogging community I keep on posting as a expression of myself.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You know for me there is a lot of processing that happens when I write a blog post. I think and ponder and express myself as vulnerable and honest, and oftentimes, the comments will shed light and perspective that I hadn’t considered.

      I can’t always get the words to come out the way I want…but I often try. So I understand what you mean.

      This blog is my third. The first two had a very small community. I don’t know what happened with this one, but I nurture it. It takes time…some months I have more time than other months…

      Either way, I encourage everyone who enjoys blogging to keep going. Keep writing.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I can associate with most things in this post. My blog focuses on a very specific and small niche market. I am ok with not a lot of interaction and it does not affect my relationship with other bloggers. I do however value the bloggers who I do follow as I see their content as part of my development as a blogger.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Wow, lots of readers like this post, and for good reason. It made me think, and also respond. How would you feel if I did a similar thing on my blog, credits to you?
    So here are my answers:

    1) Does belonging to a blogging community imply a responsibility toward the bloggers? As a reader I do feel that, yes. As a writer, partly. I feel that encouragement and connection (see more below) are important to nurture good writing and storytelling. Therefore, although I can’t read your posts as you write/release them, I do store them up and read them when I can. During Covid, about 90% of the bloggers I follow have stopped posting. This is hardly surprising given I am interested in dating & mating via the modern means of online connection. More on that below.

    2) Does it become a want or a need to read, like and/or comment regularly? A want, but one I juggle with many competing priorities eg work and family and partnering and friends.

    3) If you read, like and especially comment at least semi-regularly on a select few blogs and thereby get to *know* that blogger a little, does this relationship qualify as friendship? Sort of, the bloggers I have formed a friendship with are those who I have met in real life or connected via another channel in addition to their blog (eg, you).

    4) Is a virtual relationship through a blog real? This question is very much related to meeting people online for the purpose of dating, sex or relationships. I have thought about this a lot. I have explored some answers to this question of what constitutes ‘real’ as have many other thinkers. This is a quote I have at the beginning of my book MS about online dating and the way technology has changed the way we meet and mate: “…one of the absolute conundrums of our time: are we our real selves on the internet, or are we not?”
    Stephen Marche ‘Swallowing the Red Pill: A journey to the heart of modern misogyny’

    5) Do you feel reading there every time they post is the responsible thing to do or do you drop off on occasion? As explained, yes I drop off. But if I like someone’s work and online persona, I am loyal 🙂 I come back but when my schedule allows.

    6) If you drop off, what are the reasons you are taking a break? Work, life as above. Also there is one blogger I used to follow whose writing started to annoy me and I found her morals and ethics questionable, plus there is a big generation gap and I just was not enjoying her posts so I don’t read them anymore. I still see them come up in my emails though, so one day I may dip my toe in again.

    7) What if you extend the relationship with a blogger beyond the blog and start emailing with them? Does this make the relationship more intimate, more real? Yes, definitely! As with online dating, the way we connect with someone can be varied through many virtual channels, but until we meet IRL, we don’t genuinely know whether the connection is real. Friendships are the same. There is one blogger I have met IRL who lives in my hometown and yet we don’t see each other much now that she works full time and our lives have diverged. Also, she is no longer blogging. It takes a lot more effort and genuine common ground to maintain a relationship outside of emails, texts, messages or similar.

    8) With those more intimately connected bloggers whom you have an exterior relationship with (say through email) do you take the opportunity to check in with them when you read between the lines something they posted in their blog? Sometimes. I’d like to do it more, but I feel that my life is difficult to balance all the things I want to do. For instance. I have not done any personal writing for months now, which is a real shame as work etc has taken over. So the same goes for this – personally, I will come back to those connections where I feel there is enough common ground to sustain a conversation, albeit over email or messaging.

    9) When you formulate an opinion on a blogger based solely on what you read on their blog, do you make assumptions about them and/or their personality, character, lifestyle? Pretty hard not to! A lot of people who read my blog think I’m an incredibly confident, sassy and courageous woman. I would say that Eve’s persona encourages this, but she/I am/are also introverted, vulnerable and need our privacy. All we have to go on as readers are the words on the screen/page, and so of course we form opinions based on those. Same parallels with online dating, which causes a much bigger problem when things don’t match up to the idealised, partially true image you have inevitably formed before you meet. Hence my advice to anyone is always to meet asap.

    Thanks for giving me the opportunity to respond via these thoughtful questions. And sorry I haven’t emailed for a while 🙂 Let me know if you’re OK about me copying your idea?!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Go for it!

      Your answers to 4 have me ponder more. 🙂 I read something on your blog a long while ago I want to refer to, may make a note to revisit. Same with 8.

      I too had stuff going on…I get it. We’ll catch up again, no worries! And so happy to see you had a chance to read and even respond on this post. Quite a few readers addressed it on their own blogs. Absolutely, take what you wish and use it as you see fit. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. 1) Does belonging to a blogging community imply a responsibility toward the bloggers?

    No. Writing/reading blogs should be done because you enjoy it.

    2) Does it become a want or a need to read, like and/or comment regularly?

    For me, yes. I’m addicted, just like some people are addicted to video games, or golf, or whatever. It’s a passion.

    3) If you read, like and especially comment at least semi-regularly on a select few blogs and thereby get to *know* that blogger a little, does this relationship qualify as friendship?

    I suppose so, if the relationship meets your definition of a friendship.

    4) Is a virtual relationship through a blog real?

    It can be. I mean, think about all the people in “real life” who you thought were your friends but they turned out not to be. It’s totally possible to find a virtual friend who is a better friend to you then the friends you meet for lunch. Look at how many people get married, thinking they know their spouse and the spouse ends up murdering them. Basically you can’t trust anyone, be they in your physical world or your virtual world, right?

    5) Do you feel reading there every time they post is the responsible thing to do or do you drop off on occasion?

    I drop off on occasion. No one is interesting ALL the time. And by “drop off” I don’t mean I stop following them or anything. I mean that I end up skimming through some of their posts or skipping them completely. But I continue following them because if they talked about something I was interested in once, they probably will again.

    And like I follow A LOT of book bloggers, but I’m not really interested in their book reviews. I follow them because they write entertaining or interesting posts about their day-to-day lives and might talk briefly about a book in that post. But when that same blogger dedicates an entire post to a book review, 99.9% of the time I’m scrolling right on by. It has nothing to do with whether or not they are GOOD at writing book reviews. Maybe they are brilliant at it. I’m just not into book reviews. I write book reviews, too, but don’t really enjoy it. I do it because something inside me is driving me to do it.

    But yah, unless you’re telling me something about your life, I’m going to scroll right on by.

    6) If you drop off, what are the reasons you are taking a break?

    Ok so when you say “drop off” you’re talking about not reading that particular blog at all, right? Removing it from your reader? Unfollowing them?

    Well, I do that VERY rarely. The person has to be consistently boring for me to “drop off” in that sense.

    I’ve had a couple people leave comments on my blog and then I hop over to their blog to check them out and find that we have absolutely nothing in common so I don’t follow them or read them or comment at all. And there are some book bloggers who post nothing BUT book reviews so I’m definitely not following them.

    And just to be clear, there are SOME book reviews that catch my eye with the first sentence or two and I get sucked in and read the complete review. I’m just saying my main interest is in people’s day to day lives.

    7) What if you extend the relationship with a blogger beyond the blog and start emailing with them? Does this make the relationship more intimate, more real?

    I don’t do that, really, because we’re already talking on our blogs so why do I need to talk MORE in an email? Just catch me in the blogoverse.

    I’m pretty much talked out once I’m done writing a blog or commenting on blogs.

    8) With those more intimately connected bloggers whom you have an exterior relationship with (say through email) do you take the opportunity to check in with them when you read between the lines something they posted in their blog?

    I don’t have that kind of relationship with any bloggers.

    9) When you formulate an opinion on a blogger based solely on what you read on their blog, do you make assumptions about them and/or their personality, character, lifestyle?

    Hmm…no. I don’t think so.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You know this book review thing irks me too a bit. I rarely read them, and rarely do reviews. Having said that, I might read a book which has some quotes I want to remember which I may then incorporate into a personal blog post. I find those much more interesting than straight reviews.

      Thanks Jinjer for participating! Always enjoy seeing you drop by. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I’m new to blogging so I don’t know many answers yet. So far I’m enjoying it, but it does take a bit of faith to jump into the deep end and let people read your writing. Thanks for your post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Welcome to blogging! Yes, deep end, very apt description! 😀 It takes time to build a community if that is your aim; most people write for themselves first. A method of getting thought out of your head.

      I’ll check you out, thank you for reading commenting, John!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Oh, I was just going to hop in the shower and thought I’d check the “reader” in WordPress. I really enjoy reading your blog. 1. No. 2. Not for me, as I’m not on WordPress that much. Well, I’ve been on it a lot more since Covid-19. 3. Hmm … I don’t know, I think not really because even if I “got to know” a blogger a little, I’d hardly call them up if I was upset, or ask them to help me if I was moving, etc. 4. I suppose it could become more real if one got to know the person via email outside the blog. 5. I definitely drop off sometimes. 6. Doing other things. 7. Yes, though I’ve not done that with another blogger. 8. N/A 9. Hmm, maybe? I dunno really.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. 1.) Does belonging to a blogging community imply a responsibility toward the bloggers?

    Responsibility is a big ticket. The beauty of blogging is that you can pick it up, or leave off, depending upon the rigors of your own schedule. If you engage more closely with individuals you come to know–that may imply more of a responsibility, just as does any friendship.

    2.) Does it become a want or a need to read, like and/or comment regularly?

    No. I’m not so compulsive that I need to check in daily to my blog, or to the blogs I follow. My engagement with others’ blogs generally falls into the rubric of entertainment.

    3.) If you read, like and especially comment at least semi-regularly on a select few blogs and thereby get to *know* that blogger a little, does this relationship qualify as friendship?

    It can. It depends upon the blog. I subscribe to a number of blogs on a number of different topics–beekeeping, gardening, writing, sustainable/regenerative agriculture, environmental issues, politics and some blogs I’d characterize as personal development. I don’t feel compelled to engage, or befriend, someone who primarily blogs on technique, or matters that are issue specific. That said, I have befriended bloggers all over the globe based on our common interests.

    If I enjoy a blog, I always ‘like’ it. I don’t always comment. If I don’t like a blog, I may comment without liking. Mostly, I figure the blogger gets the numbers–but has to engage me for a like or comment.

    4.) Is a virtual relationship through a blog real?

    Sure. But it is not ‘present.’ It doesn’t replace face to face connections, but it can stand on its own as a real connection. The limitation is that not everyone is comfortable expressing themselves in writing (partly why writers are particularly accessible in blogs, more so, say, than beekeepers or orchardists.) I’ve always been one for whom writing comes naturally–I’ve been accused of having 19th century sensibilities in that regard. (Thus, brevity is not necessarily one of my graces.) I treat blogging and email as though it were a correspondence. I am appalled by texting and twitter, as they reduce and flatten expression. Could you really have a twitter relationship? Really?

    5.) Do you feel reading there every time they post is the responsible thing to do or do you drop off on occasion?

    I drop off–sometimes permanently if a bloggers thread leans away from our common interests. Sometimes, I need more time for my day to day life, and cannot take the time for blogging or responding. Because its a written thread, you can pick it up later, should time be limiting.

    6.) If you drop off, what are the reasons you are taking a break?

    Occasionally health. Often, seasonal responsibilities. Spring is difficult because I have fixed responsibilities related to season–I prune, spray, and plant trees each year. Then I have to get the garden planned and in (which I am just finishing now.) Then things ease up some. Winter is best because, from a chores perspective, it’s a slow time.

    7.) What if you extend the relationship with a blogger beyond the blog and start emailing with them? Does this make the relationship more intimate, more real?

    Yes, usually. (Unless the emails simply address technical details or topic specific information.) If the connection advances beyond the comments section, generally that means there’s a personal sharing outside the blogosphere.

    8.) With those more intimately connected bloggers whom you have an exterior relationship with (say through email) do you take the opportunity to check in with them when you read between the lines something they posted in their blog?

    Absolutely. That is especially the case, if I have insight into something that appears in the blog that I know resonates personally with my friend. There may be more sharing of context or meaning, that occurs outside the eyes of other participants in the blog. I don’t do this frequently, but every now and then, and especially if the blogger appears depressed or stuck, I’ll reach out. All that said, I’m pretty forward and if I think someone needs help, or needs to reconsider an attitudinal stance, I’m pretty forward and will address some things in the public forum.

    9.) When you formulate an opinion on a blogger based solely on what you read on their blog, do you make assumptions about them and/or their personality, character, lifestyle?

    That depends upon the type of blog. Not so much if the blog merely shares, say, beekeeping tips. If a blog addresses more personal aspects of a person’s life–then, of course, I’ll fill in the blanks a bit.

    To this I’ll add, on several occasions, I’ve had blogging relationships approaching friendships, and then the blog disappears. I’m stunned by the loss, but reluctant to reach out because the blogger has made a choice about engaging (or not) and I want to respect that choice. In at least two such situations, I feared that poor health, or mental instability, ended the blog–but I never learned the outcome. I see these has having been real losses.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am sometimes challenged with the like button and choose to comment only, as well. Good point.

      I love how you say a blogging friendship “can stand on its own as a real connection”. That’s a great way of putting it.

      The sudden disappearance of a blog has me occasionally baffled. Some bloggers I knew when the kids were young said goodbye on the blog, stating they are ready to try something new. Many of them are heavily into facebook now. Some just disappear. I haven’t considered what I would do if things were to end here for me (knowingly leaving) but I would think I’d say goodbye.

      Thank you for your elaborate response. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. I value the connections I’ve made in my teeny blogging community. The exchange of ideas and opinions, the genuine affection I feel for so many of you, means so much to me.
    Writing right now is just plain difficult. All the feels need to be expressed, but it’s tricky to do it somewhat successfully.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. That’s 9 questions, chuckle. I will comment on blog friendships – are they real? They are real blogging friendships. I think most bloggers keep them that way but they are real only in that context. I am sure that in exceptional situations they become real relationships but usually not. My wife has a friend she knows from Instagram in Holland, I think they are real friends and will eventually visit each other.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree that the majority of blog friendships have remained in the blog, so to speak. There are a few I’ve conversed with beyond WordPress. Most people I’ve “met” virtually outside of the blog have been nice. It helps that I have read their posts regularly and for some time; otherwise it wouldn’t really feel genuine.

      Thank you for your comment. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I feel like the bloggers I interact with ARE friends. Sitting here reading about your lives is like having an extended lunch with friends who linger over pitchers of friends (with me as designated driver, or course). I certainly feel much closer and connected to you guys than I do to most of the people I interact with outside my phone on a daily basis. I need you guys. I give a shit what happens to you guys.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. I find that I am avoiding, somewhat, talking about many of the major issues of the moment. A lot of this is because I just don’t have anything interesting or useful to say and a recognition that any hot take I might come out with is likely to be irrelevant at best and horribly tone-deaf at worst.

    As for your blogging questions…

    1. Not particularly. Obviously, no community can exist if there isn’t some give-and-take within that community, but ultimately blogging is something we do for ourselves and we shouldn’t lose sight of that.

    2. It’s certainly a want. I enjoy taking time out to see what people are talking about and would miss the blogosphere if it wasn’t there.

    3. and 4. I think so, in both cases.

    5. and 6. If I am following a blog then I do read every post, not neccessarily at the same speed the blogger is blogging. That said, there are blogs that I check daily and others that I check less frequently.

    7. Yes

    8. Very rarely. I’m terrible at initiating conversations and would tend to worry that either I am intruding where not wanted or that I have badly misinterpreted something.

    9. We all make assumptions about people all the time. I try to remain aware of the fact that most of my assumptions are probably wrong.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Nice to get feedback from the Brit in Belgium! You sound very British, to me, do you realize this?

      I’m glad we’re connected, I enjoy checking in with you as well.

      Typed this from the back porch wrapped in a blanket at 6:45 am…it will get hot; right now it’s just a little fesh. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Likewise, with regards checking in.

        I’m not sure what it means to sound British, although this is a huge improvement on the number of people who tell me they have no idea what I’m going on about 😉

        But I have to admit to some ignorance… fesh? Is that a typo or something Scottish?

        Liked by 1 person

  12. I usually don’t try to write much about the “big’ issues of the day because I feel there are already so many people who have written what I think, and in a way that is much better than I could ever hope to do. Part of being in the blogging community is finding people of similar interests and reading what they have to say so I don’t have to say it! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  13. 1) Does belonging to a blogging community imply a responsibility toward the bloggers? I am an over-thinker so I definitely should not worry as much about my ‘responsibility.’

    2) Does it become a want or a need to read, like and/or comment regularly? Sometimes. I am trying to not be on WordPress so much.

    3) If you read, like and especially comment at least semi-regularly on a select few blogs and thereby get to *know* that blogger a little, does this relationship qualify as friendship? No. I don’t think so. Not unless you have been, like, chatting with the blogger, which I never do.

    4) Is a virtual relationship through a blog real? Yes. I mean, if someone likes my posts it’s not like I feel a ‘connection’ with them, but definitely relationships can be made online.

    5) Do you feel reading there every time they post is the responsible thing to do or do you drop off on occasion? It depends on the blog. One blog I love, love, love only posts once a week so I ALWAYS click on their weekly post ASAP.

    6) If you drop off, what are the reasons you are taking a break? Some blogs are interesting so me but not so interesting that I make sure to catch every post.

    7) What if you extend the relationship with a blogger beyond the blog and start emailing with them? Does this make the relationship more intimate, more real? Yes. But I would never do this. For safety reasons, I have made a rule for myself that I can comment on posts, and then the blogger replies, and only very rarely do I reply to their reply. What I’m saying is, I almost never have a back-and-forth conversation. I only write one message per thread.

    8) With those more intimately connected bloggers whom you have an exterior relationship with (say through email) do you take the opportunity to check in with them when you read between the lines something they posted in their blog? Like I said, I don’t do this.

    9) When you formulate an opinion on a blogger based solely on what you read on their blog, do you make assumptions about them and/or their personality, character, lifestyle? Yes. Sometimes. This is getting me thinking… now I’m going to consider more what assumptions my readers are making based on my blog… great point.

    In conclusion — great post and great questions.

    Like

  14. Great post! I love reading how other people feel about blogging. I have been doing it since 2001; started out in an inclusive little community called Open Diary (don’t get me started on the drama that ensued there), and have seen my writing evolve over the years. I am currently reading through my first WordPress blog, started in 2010, and hardly recognize that person. Swinged Cat was born after I decided to move back to the Midwest and is more authentically me than anything else.

    1) Does belonging to a blogging community imply a responsibility toward the bloggers?

    Not necessarily, though it does require a mutual give-and-take if you want to grow the relationship.

    2) Does it become a want or a need to read, like and/or comment regularly?

    Both for me. Like I said, I’ve been doing this since 2001. AND I’m a writer. I will never stop blogging.

    3) If you read, like and especially comment at least semi-regularly on a select few blogs and thereby get to *know* that blogger a little, does this relationship qualify as friendship?

    Without a doubt. I have a LOT of friends I’ve met through blogging. I even married one. 🙂

    4) Is a virtual relationship through a blog real?

    It depends how much you open up to the other person. Some of my closest friends, people whom I have known for the better part of 15 years now, I have never actually meet in person…and yet, we exchange Christmas cards, have watched each others’ kids grow up, etc. That feels pretty real to me. As an Air Force brat, I didn’t make a lot of friends IRL that I have kept in touch with. Bloggers are the one exception.

    5) Do you feel reading there every time they post is the responsible thing to do or do you drop off on occasion?

    Only the ones I am truly interested in. Yes, there are some that I drop for a while, or only choose to read occasionally. Others I wouldn’t dream of not reading.

    6) If you drop off, what are the reasons you are taking a break?

    “Dropping off” for me means going five days without blogging. That only happens if I’ve gotten busier than usual or nothing interesting of note has happened for me to write about. Even then, I can usually pull something out of my hat. I tell my closest virtual friends: if I haven’t updated my blog in a week, send the police over for a welfare check. I’m either dead or tied up (and probably not in a good way, otherwise I’d be writing about that!).

    7) What if you extend the relationship with a blogger beyond the blog and start emailing with them? Does this make the relationship more intimate, more real?

    Yes. There’s no way it can’t.

    8) With those more intimately connected bloggers whom you have an exterior relationship with (say through email) do you take the opportunity to check in with them when you read between the lines something they posted in their blog?

    Fo sho.

    9) When you formulate an opinion on a blogger based solely on what you read on their blog, do you make assumptions about them and/or their personality, character, lifestyle?

    Of course. Doing so is human nature. I have been proven wrong, too.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I host a lifestyle blog about rocking midlife, aging gracefully, and clearly I lie! Bahaha, just kidding. I try to expose little slices in the life of those who have survived many, many, many decades of life and are now straddling the needs of children, parents, and society. I insert humor for my own benefit, maybe a few thought provoking questions, honestly as possible I explore my life in order to understand it on a deeper level. I love writing. I’m compelled by curiosity, wonder, and clearly a deep and abiding respect for the gift of life. I love finding new blogs, engaging with writers, and most importantly learning about your life and experiences because it informs my own. I’ve been enjoying your posts and engaging with you in the comments! Thanks for the great questions made me consider why I write and who it’s for.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. It’s funny but I’ve found my goofiest posts get the most views and comments, while the more serious ones don’t seem to go anywhere. Who would have thought my most viewed post would be the recipe for Pioneer Woman Rice Pilaf?? I am easily overwhelmed if I read and follow too many bloggers, but I enjoy those I do follow. I don’t always comment and I may get behind in my reading, but it’s not for a lack of interest. It does become a time thing and there are so many things I like to do, blogging (reading and writing) often takes a backseat. There are times when I wish I could blog about more personal things, mainly for therapy but I don’t for the reasons you and others have stated. I hadn’t thought about using a pseudonym. Interesting thought. Not sure how I’d get followers that way. I have increased my followers as I’ve become more involved in the blogging community but I think most of my followers are people I know.

    Like

  17. About blogging … it’s dead. It’s primarily bloggers reading bloggers.

    We’re simply here because there’s no place else that’ll have us 😊 …

    1) Does belonging to a blogging community imply a responsibility toward the bloggers?

    No, except try to be nice to one another and respectful.

    2) Does it become a want or a need to read, like and/or comment regularly?

    It’s the blogger’s choice as to how committed they feel is necessary. Bloggers read, comment and like partially out of habit, to reciprocate, and genuine interest.

    3) If you read, like and especially comment at least semi-regularly on a select few blogs and thereby get to *know* that blogger a little, does this relationship qualify as friendship?

    My definition of being “friendly” and “friendship” are quite different though I have made friends online.

    4) Is a virtual relationship through a blog real?

    No, it’s virtual if you’re referring to a relationship that is defined by something greater than merely exchanging comments and pleasantries. Virtual and real are not nearly the same. There are few expectations, responsibilities and obligations in a virtual relationship.

    5) Do you feel reading there every time they post is the responsible thing to do or do you drop off on occasion?

    I read only what interests me and primarily with bloggers I enjoy, respect and reciprocate dialogue. I will like blogs simply because of the content but don’t necessarily feel obligated to comment.

    6) If you drop off, what are the reasons you are taking a break?

    Blogging is exhausting and overly consumptive of time. I’d rather be writing than blogging, but I enjoy the interactions of many writers here.

    7) What if you extend the relationship with a blogger beyond the blog and start emailing with them? Does this make the relationship more intimate, more real?

    Depends on the nature of the relationship. I’ve had some wonderful experiences and a couple I’ve wondered if WP is really just a shitty online dating App for horny writers …

    8) With those more intimately connected bloggers whom you have an exterior relationship with (say through email) do you take the opportunity to check in with them when you read between the lines something they posted in their blog?

    I’ve connected offline with several bloggers through mutual interest. Almost everything I write is mess of cryptic nonsense, so it’s all in between now the lines for me.

    9) When you formulate an opinion on a blogger based solely on what you read on their blog, do you make assumptions about them and/or their personality, character, lifestyle?

    No, I leave assumptions for the privileged, blissful ignorant and judgemental dinks. My conscience and intellect doesn’t permit it. There is a gift and skill to reading, just as there is to writing and creativity. Without this aptitude, one is better off using telepathy to communicate. All writing should evoke some response or feeling or thought in the readers.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. 1) Does belonging to a blogging community imply a responsibility toward the bloggers?
    I think the responsibility is to be kind and not troll. Also be authentic.

    2) Does it become a want or a need to read, like and/or comment regularly?
    Both – depends on my mood. If someone has an ongoing drama, life issue unfolding it becomes a need. I gotta know what happens next!

    3) If you read, like and especially comment at least semi-regularly on a select few blogs and thereby get to *know* that blogger a little, does this relationship qualify as friendship?
    I would hope so! I think there are all different types and levels of friendships. I consider you a new blogger friend, for example.

    4) Is a virtual relationship through a blog real?
    Yes if the people are being their authentic selves. However, it also depends on the blog. I follow food blogs and adore the blogger for their writing, photos, recipes, however, I put them in a completely different category from bloggers like you and I.

    5) Do you feel reading there every time they post is the responsible thing to do or do you drop off on occasion?
    I can’t put that much pressure on myself. I was 50 before I could allow myself not to finish a book I didn’t like. I do as I please 😉. If you read Gretchen Rubin and her 4 Tendencies, I am an Obliger in full scale rebellion.
    6) If you drop off, what are the reasons you are taking a break?
    That thing called real life. It interferes with my virtual life on occasion. Also sometimes I just need a break from everything.

    7) What if you extend the relationship with a blogger beyond the blog and start emailing with them? Does this make the relationship more intimate, more real?
    Absolutely. I have emailed with 1-2 bloggers and met one in real life.

    8) With those more intimately connected bloggers whom you have an exterior relationship with (say through email) do you take the opportunity to check in with them when you read between the lines something they posted in their blog?
    Yes, particularly one who was going through a very difficult time.

    9) When you formulate an opinion on a blogger based solely on what you read on their blog, do you make assumptions about them and/or their personality, character, lifestyle?
    Uh yeah! I totally jump to conclusions, however, I keep said opinions to myself. 😎 Sometimes I nail it, sometimes I am way off. I think that’s part of the fun – the mystery of the blogger. Take me, for example, I try to maintain my anonymity. Why? I feel like I can let down my guard that way. My blog started out very racy so I wanted some semblance of privacy and now I just like the privacy. If you, for example, reached out to me, I wouldn’t hesitate to tell you my real name and more personal details.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you friend. 🙂

      Yes, I agree with everything you say. I have read other blogs with ‘racy’ content and almost all of them are using a pseudonym. I wrote a whole thing on that topic some time ago (I may revisit later) and agree with the letting your guard down comment. I have a pseudonym place where I write as well and I can be much more open/vulnerable there than I would in a place where my real name and my excessive selfies are in your face. 🙂

      Thank you for taking the time to respond! I enjoy reading you, as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I started my blog purely out of a need to write, but like you I find the act of writing rather than the content to be what helps – sometimes I’ll have a little rant about what’s going on in the world but even then I try and keep it light and mock the things that annoy me. Mostly though I write to entertain myself and it could be about the most banal thing that has vaguely amused me. But I tend to write a lot when I’m most troubled with the world, hence a lot of activity in recent months, because the world is beyond my current comprehension. In terms of other bloggers, I’m not always the best at interacting, but there are a few that I would consider blog friends. I don’t know if I would get on with them in ‘real life’ or want to spend time in their company. I like to think I probably would in most cases, but I’m not sure it’s the point – they are my blogging friends and it’s through blogging that we connect. It makes it a more enriching experience being able to interact with other bloggers, I’m not always great at commenting on other bloggers posts – something I’m trying to rectify – but I love it when people comment on mine.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Comments don’t have to be long or complicated (like yours, and mine too – just kidding!) but I do think they should be genuine. It’s not an obligation.

      You are also one of my more recent discoveries and although I do read you regularly so far I don’t always comment either. I mean, the point is the reading, mostly. You put a smile on my face.

      I have a significant UK following, and developed a relatively close relationship with a couple of bloggers beyond the blog. We email occasionally. It’s nice, and personal, but will not guarantee a meetup. I’m not the most socially adept person to begin with and like the communications online almost better.

      Having said that, there are a few bloggers who have met other bloggers and the ones I know about describe it as a positive experience.

      So, there’s my wordy words, again. Welcome to my blog, James.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. 1) Does belonging to a blogging community imply a responsibility toward the bloggers?
    Responsible? I don’t feel that way. I write what I want and never really consider the audience. That’s probably not smart, right?
    2) Does it become a want or a need to read, like and/or comment regularly?

    In spite of what I answered in #1, I do feel a need to do all of the above.

    3) If you read, like and especially comment at least semi-regularly on a select few blogs and thereby get to *know* that blogger a little, does this relationship qualify as friendship?

    It’s definitely a kind of friendship.

    4) Is a virtual relationship through a blog real?

    Yes

    5) Do you feel reading there every time they post is the responsible thing to do or do you drop off on occasion?

    Sometimes I drop off. While I’ve been working on my novel I’ve been MIA a lot.

    6) If you drop off, what are the reasons you are taking a break?

    See above. 😊
    7) What if you extend the relationship with a blogger beyond the blog and start emailing with them? Does this make the relationship more intimate, more real?
    8) With those more intimately connected bloggers whom you have an exterior relationship with (say through email) do you take the opportunity to check in with them when you read between the lines something they posted in their blog?
    9) When you formulate an opinion on a blogger based solely on what you read on their blog, do you make assumptions about them and/or their personality, character, lifestyle?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. There is no right or wrong answer. And your answer today can change tomorrow. Or tonight. Or several times a day (hey, we’re women, we’re allowed to change our minds…) 😛

      That’s part of the beauty of it, isn’t it?

      I love your blog. Audience or not, I enjoy visiting you!

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Ummm, that’s a lot of questions!

    Do the answers depend upon what blogs in general are being used for? Promotion/exposure, education or information of some sort, or simple connection in an extended social media platform…

    I think purpose has something to do with everything you asked. Some bloggers will expand their reach outside the blog and draw more connections with others- more friendships if you will. Other bloggers aren’t necessarily looking for that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Cupcakecache mentioned the commercial side of blogging. It’s not why I’m here (nor is she). They have a place in society today I think; some use blogs to sell their writing, which is part of it. I don’t know if I’ll ever go that route but I won’t say I won’t consider it…

      What I will say is I don’t purchase product off blogs, like vitamins, health products, that sort of thing. I might be enticed to buy an indie book based on getting to know a blogger more, and have (twice) and will again, but I purchased elsewhere, not from the blog itself.

      Blogging for me is story telling, decompression, connection. Is that how you see it?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Definitely. I don’t read blogs that are commercial or promotional, no matter how many times they try to “follow” my blog and reel me in!
        Blogging provides a social connection that is definitely more intimate than IG or Facebook or whatever else people use. That’s what’s important to me.

        Liked by 1 person

  22. I enjoy blogging as a relief for stress like you and to see if my writing works with anyone. I sometimes follow bloggers based on location or interaction. I don’t like commercial blogs or blogs destined to sell something including health products or a healthy lifestyle. Sometimes I want “just the facts.” And that includes someone else’s life because it is a)good entertainment b) reaffirms a virtual friendship or connection .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The commercial blogs have a place in today’s society but like you, this is not why I visit the blogs. I don’t want to buy things, or be solicited at. I want to read, connect, engage. Have some fun. Do some thinking.

      And yes there is some good (and some bad) entertainment out there… 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  23. I started blogging on Yahoo 360 many, many moons ago. We were a small, tight knit group of virtual friends who got to know each other quite well. We followed each other from site to site and some of us are still FB friends today. I used to blog very personal things but got burned by a family member who didn’t appreciate my honesty. It’s been 10 years and we still don’t speak! So now? I blog for entertainment and keep it light. It used to be a cathartic place I worked out the stresses of life. Now? I share laughter, woodchucks, vacations and the (not so) occasional cocktail. I enjoy meeting new people and seeing different parts of the world. Interaction and commenting is an important aspect for me. Drive by likings just doesn’t cut it. But that’s the great thing about blogging. It can be anything you want it to be.
    😉

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Agree about the importance of About pages — these should also be updated regularly. I think the blogosphere is a funny space: yes, you can form relationships, but they are very particular and on your own terms. I enjoy wriitng, and sharing thoughts with other bloggers.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I have had occasion to get to know people outside of the blog. It’s been very interesting. Some I will likely never meet, as they are geographically too far away, others I may at some point post-pandemic. You never know.

      Thank you for commenting. I enjoy coming to your blog as well, you are very unique. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Hmmmm. First off, I wanted to right light posts, but I just can’t. I just don’t understand anyone anymore.
    Secondly, I like the blog interaction….I think it’s an important aspect of blogging to me able to exchange deals in an open forum.
    But that being said, I think after the events of the past few months, I just can’t blog much anymore. I am tired of the hypocrisy that exists right now

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You are very good at the interaction, thought-provocation, engagement. You write about contemporary topics. I enjoy reading and commenting on you. I don’t always have the time and/or mental space to respond as much as I’d like to…I know you get it.

      Falling off the blogging wagon happens to me as well. I have other places where I write a completely different genre under a pseudonym and it’s more of a place to dump things I can’t/won’t here. But I have also taken a complete break. It’s healing, to do this.

      You hang in there. And you know how to reach me if you want to chat/rant/cry.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It’s ok to be afraid, perturbed, etc. I also don’t like to ‘fight’ online. But you have a talent in writing out your thoughts diplomatically, and engaging diplomatically. Unfortunately not everyone is like this. And, you recognize yourself enough to know that some triggers may have you act in a way you don’t typically do if someone is less than diplomatic, or polite, or inclusive.

        If you’re feeling volatile, write but keep it in draft form and let it ‘rattle around’ before publishing. Or don’t publish. It helps to get the thoughts out. I have 471 draft posts in my WP folder, most will never ever see the light of day.

        Liked by 2 people

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